I Remember the Worst Day of My Life…

 

Price  $665. "I Remember the Worst Day of My Life: I Forgot My Crayons" 24"x36"

Price $665. “I Remember the Worst Day of My Life: I Forgot My Crayons” 24″x36″. Contact me to add this painting to your private art collection.


In kindergarten, we had cubby holes where we would put our school supplies. One morning, while emptying out my book bag, I realized I had forgotten my crayon box. I got a huge sinking feeling in my stomach. I wondered, “How am I ever going to get through the day without my crayons?”

Needless to say, I started to cry. 

The teacher ran over and asked if I was okay. I simply said, “My stomach hurts.”

She quickly got the front office to call my mom. A little while later I was in my own bed, waiting for my mom to bring me some soup for my aching tummy, which was no longer aching. As she fed me my soup, she asked “Are you feeling better?” I nodded my head as I told her how I had forgotten my crayons. With a look of understanding in her eyes, she asked, “Is that why you started crying?” 

I replied, “No.”

If she could only understand the feeling of helplessness I had the moment I realized my crayons were no where to be found, the way my stomach turned at the thought of a day without them, then she would understand that the stomach ache was real. 

My mom proceeded to feed me my soup and said “You know, next time you forget your crayons, you can just ask your teacher if you can share with someone.” The thought had never crossed my mind, if only I had known sooner 🙂

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2 thoughts on “I Remember the Worst Day of My Life…

  1. What a great story Yvonne…surfacing these deeply impacting memories after all these years. You illustrate this humanistic subject matter that once received with the story gives these faceless characters the intended vivid expression of emotion. Reading your story, I started thinking of my own childhood and remembering, identifying with how you felt. It’s so innocent, open and real. No one really brings out their childhood past into an open book of illustrations, engaging the viewer to dig deep and reminisce of their own, with a smile.

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